Creative Destruction

A process through which something new brings about the demise of whatever existed before it. The standard example is the buggy-whip manufacturers who went out of business as automobiles overtook the horse and buggy.

A Look Back At Why Blockbuster Really Failed And Why It Didn't Have To

Blockbuster went bankrupt in 2010 and Netflix is now a $28 billion dollar company, about ten times what Blockbuster was worth.

50 Stores You Once Loved That You'll Never Be Able To Shop At Again

From declining foot traffic to the rise of ecommerce, countless stores have permanently closed their doors for a number of reasons.

The Indicator: Tears for Sears

Sears changed the way Americans buy consumer goods, its dominance of the retail landscape lasting for nearly a century. But the competencies needed to thrive in retail changed a few decades ago, and Sears failed to adapt — losing more and more ground to its rivals Walmart and Amazon.

Netflix vs Blockbuster Revisited - What’s Next for Digital Streaming

A brief podcast that highlights the concept of "creative destruction."

99 per cent invisible: 99 per cent details, Ep. 04

It’s a stick with bristles poking out of it. It doesn’t even qualify as a simple machine, but the careful thought and design that went into the creation of the modern, angled bristle, fat handled toothbrush shows just how much brainpower goes into something that is designed to simply work well and not be noticed all that much (until it’s time to buy the next one).

Magic Washing Machine - Hans Rosling - Video

What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine.

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